Disability Equality Training

Thriving on Diversity (it’s what we do)

Diversity is a fundamental and inescapable fact of life.  However, diversity is not just about acknowledging difference; it’s about valuing and understanding the uniqueness of each person’s contribution to the workplace, to the community and to society.

Successful organisations have practices which challenge discrimination and promote respect and inclusion. Such places are creative, supportive and productive.

Take a proactive approach to managing diversity and demonstrate to staff and customers that you are sensitive to their beliefs, traditions and access needs. Unintentional slip ups and misunderstandings can cost you money and damage your reputation.

At Proudlock Associates our experienced consultants work only on equality issues, that means we’re specialists and you can be sure of getting a  first class  service.

Thank you for your interest in equality training.  Below are sample course outlines that we’ve recently delivered.  All of our courses can be amended to suit your company needs – for example we have 2 hour Breakfast Briefings for executives and there are half day sessions for staff who cannot be released for a whole day.

Proudlock Associates is offering a half-day training courses on The Equality Act 2010 

Disability & the Equality Act:  UK legislation around equality and diversity changed on October 1st 2010.   Whilst the Equality Act 2010 brings together into new legislation 116 pieces of existing legislation (including the Disability Discrimination Act), it also extends the numbers of people who are protected in law and it strengthens previous legislation.

Equality Act 2010 training will quickly bring you up to speed with changes that relate to disability in your organisation.  Find out about

  • What has changed in the definition of disability.
  • What the introduction of indirect disability discrimination will mean for your organisation.
  • The new provisions restricting pre-employment health questions.
  • Providing actual ‘Reasonable adjustment’ in your organisation.
  • Make reasonable adjustments to your organisational policies and procedures around such things as sickness absence, performance management and redeployment.
  • Fair selection in situations regarding redundancies in the workplace.

Who is this course for? –  HR staff, diversity professionals, operational managers, contract managers, procurement professionals and  anyone responsible for  recruiting staff.

The Equality Act 2010 for front line staff:  Take a proactive approach to managing diversity

Find out about:

  • Key principles of equality and diversity.
  • Overview of the Equality Act.
  • Direct & indirect discrimination.
  • Positive action: how far does the Equality Act 2010 allow businesses to go?
  • The new public sector duties.
  • Challenging prejudice and stereotypes.
  • Delivering inclusive services.
  • When things go wrong: dealing with conflict.
An Introduction To Disability
Course Duration1day
Target AudienceAnyone new to disability, people wanting to have a fresh understanding of disability.
Course AimsThe course will provide you with an overview of rights for disabled people, exploring and dispelling some of the myths around disability.
Discuss and ask questions in a relaxed environment.
Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the communication, etiquette and language issues around disability.
  2. Develop an understanding of the barriers that disabled people experience when accessing services and be aware of how these might be addressed.
  3. Develop your knowledge about the facts on disability.
  4. Understand the role that attitudes play and how they may need to be shaped.
Delegate numbersMaximum 14
Location

 

Attendance Management & Disability
Course Duration1day
Target AudienceHuman Resource Managers, occupational health (OH) advisers and senior managers with recruitment responsibility.
Course AimsThe course will provide an overview of the disability related parts of the Equality Act in relation to employment.    It looks at the recruitment of new disabled employees, the retention of existing staff and making reasonable adjustments in the workplace including adjustments for people with hidden impairments such as dyslexia and mental health conditions.
Learning Outcomes
  1. To have an overview of the disability related parts of the Equality Act and who is protected in law.
  2. Explain the concept of “reasonable adjustment” and identify examples of its implementation in employment.
  3. Identify inappropriate language and terminology regarding disability and be able to state alternative terms that are acceptable and respectful to disabled people.
  4. Identify appropriate use of medical questionnaires, OH reports.
  5. To understand more about triggers to workplace absence
    • Short term absence
    • Long term absence
    • Disability Related leave
  6. To look at a process for monitoring the provision of adjustments in the workplace
  7. To explain  how Access to Work can assist disabled people in the workplace.
Delegate numbersMaximum 14
Location

 

Producing Accessible Information For Disabled People
Course Duration1day
Target AudienceOperational or project managers who are responsible for developing, delivering or improving services.  Also communication managers and staff responsible for publications and information to the public and managers in customer care services.
Course AimsTo have an inclusive and professional approach to information and communication with disabled people. The course will provide an overview of the disability related parts of the Equality Act, looking at making reasonable adjustments such as accessible formats and for example meeting the Service Providers duties , Employers Duties and the General and Specific Equality Duties.
Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand more about the attitudinal, environmental and organisational barriers that disabled people face
  2. To have an overview of the disability related parts of the Equality Act and who is protected in law.
  3. Explain the concept of “reasonable adjustment” and identify examples of its implementation in your services.
  4. Identify inappropriate language and terminology regarding disability and be able to state alternative terms that are acceptable and respectful to disabled people.
  5. Identifying good practice to ensure confidence when involving or consulting with disabled people about service
    • Hosting accessible events, meetings
    • Working with sign language interpreters
    • Providing information in accessible formats
Delegate numbersMaximum 14
Location